FacebookInstagramTwitterContact

 

Forget The Human Centipede, It’s The Caterpillar Version That’s Freaking Us Out           >>           Adam Rippon Will Be Olympic Correspondent For The Rest Of 2018 Winter Games           >>           In Latest Social Justice Insanity, Black Lives Matter Attacks “Rap Yoga” Class As Racist           >>           Sea Buckthorn Protects Your Heart, Offers Antioxidant Health Benefits           >>           Lemon Verbena Extract Found To Reduce Muscle Damage After Exercise           >>           Indonesia mulls ban on maids to Malaysia           >>           Senior citizen kicked while riding motorcycle           >>           Selling property with help from agents and apps           >>           Jose Mourinho concerned about Man United fitness for UCL game at Sevilla           >>           Stronger Yen May Risk Pushing Bank of Japan Taper Further Away           >>          

 

SHARE THIS ARTICLE




REACH US


GENERAL INQUIRY

[email protected]

 

ADVERTISING

[email protected]

 

PRESS RELEASE

[email protected]

 

HOTLINE

+673 222-0178 [Office Hour]

+673 223-6740 [Fax]

 



Upcoming Events


Chinese New Year (16th-17th Jan 2018)
| 00:00 AM


Yes2Malaysia education
February 19th, 2018 | 10:00 AM


Brunei Gastronomy Week
February 23rd, 2018 | 08:00 AM


Negara Brunei Darussalam 34th National Day
February 23rd, 2018 | 10:00 AM





Prayer Times


The prayer times for Brunei-Muara and Temburong districts. For Tutong add 1 minute and for Belait add 3 minutes.


Imsak

: 05:06AM

Subuh

: 05:16AM

Syuruk

: 06:35AM

Doha

: 06:57AM

Zohor

: 12:35PM

Asar

: 03:54PM

Maghrib

: 06:34PM

Isyak

: 07:44PM

 



The Business Directory


 

 



Malaysia


  Home > Malaysia


Rescued – Only To Die Of Poor Care


 


 May 20th, 2017  |  09:08 AM  |   2062 views

PETALING JAYA

 

 Thousands of protected animals seized by the Department of Wildlife and National Parks (Perhilitan) have died in the hands of the authority in the past year due to mishandling.

 

These animals, many of which are endangered species and exotic, were being smuggled or kept illegally by local pet owners when they were seized.

 

A source said the lack of expertise and knowledge to handle these animals in captivity led to their death.

 

Among the animals that died in Perhilitan custody were 1,000 Indian Star tortoises and 10 juvenile and baby langurs.

 

These two species were seized from illegal dealers in mid-2016 and March 27 respectively.

 

Other animals that have died in the Perhilitan rescue centres include Asian Leopard Cats, small primates including endangered gibbons, and exotic white-rumped Shamas (murai batu).

 

The source said these animals were among many other seized species kept at the department’s National Wildlife Rescue Centre in Sungkai, Perak, and at Sungai Tengi, Selangor.

 

These two husbandries are Perhilitan’s main holding centres for seized animals.

 

The department has 11 other conservation centres nationwide which serve as holding centres for seized wildlife.

 

The source said many of the handlers have little or no knowledge in keeping, handling and caring for the animals.

 

“They are not well trained to handle these species and have little knowledge or technical expertise to take care of the animals, which are kept at the centres waiting to be repatriated to their country of origin.

 

 

 

 

“As such, these animals were neglected. They were not properly fed, given the right diet, or housed in proper facilities.

 

“These factors,” said the source, “caused the animals to be stressed from captivity, thus making them prone to disease and death.”

 

A former Perhilitan veterinarian said there was a need for rangers to be trained to handle these animals.

 

“Many do not know what are the best practices for the animals they are dealing with.

 

“They don’t have the basic knowledge such as the characteristics or even diet of these species to care for them.

 

“As such, the animals get sick, are stressed and die,” he said.

 

He said Perhilitan had its own veterinarians to deal with the seized animals but all these officers were seconded from the Veterinary Department.

 

“Many of us are trained in handling domestic animals and learn to deal with exotic animals and wildlife after joining Perhilitan,” he added.

 

Traffic, a wildlife trade monitoring network, says Malaysia is one of many South-East Asian countries that does not have expertise to handle seized smuggled animals in captivity.

 

Its South-East Asia director Chris Shepherd said Traffic was aware of Perhilitan’s problem but added that this could be averted or minimised if the department takes steps to have a working group comprising members from Perhilitan, the Customs Department, and academicians.

 

He said it was a challenge for the department to care for the seized animals as it had to deal with many different species.

 

“However, if they pool their resources together, it would reduce the mortality rate,” he said.

 

Shepherd said that allowing a private rescue agency to deal with these exotic and imported species would also boost the survival rate of the seized animals.

 

 

 


 

Source:
courtesy of THE STAR

by VINCENT TAN and EDDIE CHUA

 

If you have any stories or news that you would like to share with the global online community, please feel free to share it with us by contacting us directly at [email protected]

 

Related News


Pitas Holds Longest CNY Festival

 2018-02-19 09:52:18

Sacred Tibetan Monastery In Lhasa Hit By Fire

 2018-02-19 11:18:19

Stronger Yen May Risk Pushing Bank of Japan Taper Further Away

 2018-02-19 10:48:44